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Creating Sound for Video | A Creative Commons Journey
Ted Laderas is a sound engineer and an amateur cellist from Portland, Oregon. A track called “Silhouettes” he submitted for the “Instagr/am/bient” weekly challenge from communal sound-making SoundCloud group Disquiet Junto has landed in different videos through Creative Commons. See the videos in which “Silhouettes” has been used here.
"It’s incredibly energizing to see that people like your music so much to include it in their video,” says Ted, who says “Silhouettes” has led to opportunities to work with dance choreographers and more video producers. “It provides me with new contexts with which to think of my music.”
SoundCloud has become a tool for Ted to showcase his portfolio of sounds easily. “SoundCloud has been incredibly useful as a way to show my work to others, especially video producers. I keep a wide variety of tracks available on my page, and one of the people I worked with who produced a video for Stumptown Coffee discovered a track he wanted to use in the video.”
Read more on the blog.
We’re continuing to profile more creators involved in creating for video and film this week. Stay tuned on the blog, Tumblr and Twitter.

Creating Sound for Video | A Creative Commons Journey

Ted Laderas is a sound engineer and an amateur cellist from Portland, Oregon. A track called “Silhouettes” he submitted for the “Instagr/am/bient” weekly challenge from communal sound-making SoundCloud group Disquiet Junto has landed in different videos through Creative Commons. See the videos in which “Silhouettes” has been used here.

"It’s incredibly energizing to see that people like your music so much to include it in their video,” says Ted, who says “Silhouettes” has led to opportunities to work with dance choreographers and more video producers. “It provides me with new contexts with which to think of my music.”

SoundCloud has become a tool for Ted to showcase his portfolio of sounds easily. “SoundCloud has been incredibly useful as a way to show my work to others, especially video producers. I keep a wide variety of tracks available on my page, and one of the people I worked with who produced a video for Stumptown Coffee discovered a track he wanted to use in the video.”

Read more on the blog.

We’re continuing to profile more creators involved in creating for video and film this week. Stay tuned on the blog, Tumblr and Twitter.

Creating Sound for Video: Connections that lead to opportunities
Emotional moments in video are often accompanied by sound, perhaps a musical score that strikes a chord, heightening the emotions in video. Or hear a piece of music in the context of a striking visual or scene. Video also brings context to sound. Starting today, we’ll explore the complementary relationship between sound and video. We’ll meet SoundCloud community members who have had opportunities to experiment with creating for video and film.
Spread across four different countries, five SoundCloud community members collaborated to create the soundtrack for web tv series After Hell, a story of post-apocalyptic zombie life.
SoundClouders Cyra Morgan (based in Rochester, New York) contributed vocals, Deane Ogden (Jakarta, Indonesia and Los Angeles, CA) played drums, Dave McKeown (Devon, UK) contributed clarinet and flute, Oliver Sadie played the piano, and his wife Penny Sadie played the cello from London, UK.
The opportunity to not only score but also produce the show came directly from connecting with the show’s creator Alexander Hölzl at the 2011 G-tech creativity competition, said Oliver, who also produced the series. Oliver was a music finalist in the competition with the help of the SoundCloud community.
Building connections with the SoundCloud community has impacted Oliver’s professional career as a composer in film and television. “I have learned so much from people of all musical backgrounds and it has been immensely rewarding.” He emphasizes that if you’re planning a similar venture, don’t do it alone.
Read more on the blog. We’re continuing to profile more creators involved in creating for video. Stay tuned on the blog, Tumblr and Twitter next week.

Creating Sound for Video: Connections that lead to opportunities

Emotional moments in video are often accompanied by sound, perhaps a musical score that strikes a chord, heightening the emotions in video. Or hear a piece of music in the context of a striking visual or scene. Video also brings context to sound. Starting today, we’ll explore the complementary relationship between sound and video. We’ll meet SoundCloud community members who have had opportunities to experiment with creating for video and film.

Spread across four different countries, five SoundCloud community members collaborated to create the soundtrack for web tv series After Hell, a story of post-apocalyptic zombie life.

SoundClouders Cyra Morgan (based in Rochester, New York) contributed vocals, Deane Ogden (Jakarta, Indonesia and Los Angeles, CA) played drums, Dave McKeown (Devon, UK) contributed clarinet and flute, Oliver Sadie played the piano, and his wife Penny Sadie played the cello from London, UK.

The opportunity to not only score but also produce the show came directly from connecting with the show’s creator Alexander Hölzl at the 2011 G-tech creativity competition, said Oliver, who also produced the series. Oliver was a music finalist in the competition with the help of the SoundCloud community.

Building connections with the SoundCloud community has impacted Oliver’s professional career as a composer in film and television. “I have learned so much from people of all musical backgrounds and it has been immensely rewarding.” He emphasizes that if you’re planning a similar venture, don’t do it alone.

Read more on the blogWe’re continuing to profile more creators involved in creating for video. Stay tuned on the blog, Tumblr and Twitter next week.

SoundCloud Creator Profile | Colonel Chris Hadfield 

When Canadian astronaut Colonel Chris Hadfield was as far from home as a human can get, he used SoundCloud to share the sounds of the International Space Station and connect with everyone back on Earth.

During six months in orbit, including three as the Commander of the International Space Station, Hadfield documented the sounds of his daily life – things like Spacewalk Pressure Equalization,Spacesuit Bleed and Shutdown, and many of the ambient noises from inside the space station. Occasionally, he also recorded folk songs (he’s a longtime musician).

Now back on earth, Colonel Hadfield was gracious enough to take some time out of his busy retirement to answers a few questions for us. Hear him talk further about the noisiest and quietest places on the space station, what landing back on earth was like, and how he was able to get a guitar into space. 

Incredible Visualization of Resonance

In this fascinating illustration of resonance, one of the many complexities of Sound, YouTuber Brusspup uses a tone generator and speaker to vibrate a plate covered in salt. As the frequencies change, each tone generates a new and increasingly complex geometric pattern. 

dream-explore-create:

As a child, one of my favorite past times was curling up next to my mother for story time. She’d read me books and sometimes even make up her own stories. She spoke very animatedly, varied her tone and pitch to match the plot, and contorted her face to convey every last emotion. Perhaps that is why people say I make all those same expressions today. I watched and learned from my favorite storyteller for years.

Now I’m “grown,” and away from home, and my sister is too. She’s currently raising her two sons more than 7,000 miles away from me on an itty bitty island called Guam. Everyone knows I’m not a “kid person,” but I positively adore my nephew Josiah, and though I’ve never met Samuel, I know I will equally relish his attention.

 
I don’t want to be some foreign moniker, only mentioned when it’s time to sign ye olde obligatory birthday card or when mom and dad reminisce about high school days. I need to be proactive and make the most of the technology at my fingertips if I am going to find a way to be present in their lives from across the ocean. 

So I’ve begun a story time series on SoundCloud. I am going to read Josiah and Samuel some of my childhood favorites, and they can learn who kooky Aunt Abby is through her retelling of some fabulous tales. Besides, that is the beauty of lore—stories are meant to be passed down from generation to generation through the act of telling, not transcribing. 

Here is my first attempt, with the short story “Tikki Tikki Tembo,” by Arlene Mosel. I loved this story as a child, and I still love it today. 

To my sweet nephews, with love. 

Liebe,

Aunt Abby

Really cool use of storytelling through sounds :)

Reblogged 1 year ago from heyabigailmae